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dirty electricity and the Cornet ED88T
March 23, 2017
6:10 am
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fodaayoh
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Hello,
Does the Cornet ED88T detect dirty electriciy in one of its modes?

March 23, 2017
4:31 pm
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peter williamson
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hi fodaayoh
Welcome to the forum. You may have seen the comprehensive review of the ED88T on the main site (https://www.electricsense.com/1…..emf-meter/). This may answer your question.
Looking at the meter’s spec, the answer seems to be ‘maybe’ – the meter measures up to 50KHz, but Magda Havas and others say that DE is usually in the range 4-100KHz.
You might find this interesting (https://www.electricsense.com/f…..ectricity/). Note that since I did this test Gigahertz seem to have changed their meters so the comments now apply to the 3840B. The frequency selection seems to be less flexible than the one I tested. Manuals can be found online.
The usual way of measuring DE is with a Stetzer Microsurge meter, which plugs in to an electric socket. Its advantage is that it is inexpensive and very easy to use and to understand (https://www.electricsense.com/1…..gs-filter/). The possible advantage of the Gigahertz/Cornet meters is that they measure in the room rather than in the wires – although most experts seem not to be too concerned about this.
Perhaps someone with first-hand experience of the Cornet will be able to provide more information.

March 29, 2017
3:24 am
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fodaayoh
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Thanks a lot, I hadn’t heard of Gigahertz before you mentioned them. They look pretty good.

November 4, 2018
4:16 pm
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RHeff
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Bumping this topic in the hope that someone can help…
I have a Cornet ED88T plus. I understand this is not a dedicated dirty electricity meter, however I guess if there is dirty electricity in wiring it is emmitting electric and/or magnetric radiation, which the Cornet does measure. When I hold the meter up to sockets or the parts of wall over electric cables, the Cornet reads electric and magnetic radiation. So, do I really need to get a separate dedicated dirty electricity meter? Maybe the Cornet is sufficient?
If I were to get a dirty electricity meter, that would tell me if there is dirty electricity in the socket / wiring, but it wouldn’t show me what impact that has on the room, e.g. where I sit, sleep etc.. Surely being able to take a reading from places like your bed is what is useful, which a dirty electricit meter won’t provide?
Maybe I’m missing something. Would appreciate any advice anyone could offer.

November 5, 2018
7:02 pm
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Perene
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RHeff said
Bumping this topic in the hope that someone can help…
I have a Cornet ED88T plus. I understand this is not a dedicated dirty electricity meter, however I guess if there is dirty electricity in wiring it is emmitting electric and/or magnetric radiation, which the Cornet does measure. When I hold the meter up to sockets or the parts of wall over electric cables, the Cornet reads electric and magnetic radiation. So, do I really need to get a separate dedicated dirty electricity meter? Maybe the Cornet is sufficient?
If I were to get a dirty electricity meter, that would tell me if there is dirty electricity in the socket / wiring, but it wouldn’t show me what impact that has on the room, e.g. where I sit, sleep etc.. Surely being able to take a reading from places like your bed is what is useful, which a dirty electricit meter won’t provide?
Maybe I’m missing something. Would appreciate any advice anyone could offer.  

It’s better if you buy a gaussmeter for measuring magnetic fields and use a body voltage meter for measuring electric fields. The Cornet ED88TPlus will not be enough for the two.

P.S. I bought the UHS2 from AlphaLab for measuring magnetic fields. I think this is the best cost-benefit.

Here are the reasons I gathered after doing some research (I’ll put the sources in the end of my post):

MAGNETIC FIELDS:

Regarding measuring AC magnetic field EMFs (the “M” of the EMF), on the other hand, that mode in the Cornet ED88T is single axis, not triple axis, as the magnetic field mode is in the new Tri-Field Model TF-2 (and the older 100XE models). As a 3-axis Gauss meter, you essentially get the same reading in any orientation. So, if you want an easier meter to read accurate magnetic field
readings and not miss the true value because you don’t want to have to move the meter in all three axes, choose the Tri-Field TF-2.

Also, the Tri-Field TF-2 appears to measure electric field readings somewhat lower than the Cornet ED88T, getting down closer to 1 V/m. This is very important to us when measuring sleeping areas. (Of course, my all time favorite for accurately measuring AC electric field EMFs
where you sleep is still the body voltage meter.

=======
How to Measure Magnetic Fields with your Gaussmeter
=======

Whatever Gaussmeter you choose, we recommend that you measure for magnetic fields in your home with electric loads (light switches, appliances) turned on and then off to see if there is a difference. You will always measure magnetic fields close to a light switch or outlet (within an
inch or two).

That is normal and will not harm you because the reading drops off to near zero when you move away more than an inch or so. However, if you still measure elevated magnetic fields a foot or more away from the wall (or as you move the Gaussmeter up the wall) when the
switch is on, we would say you have a wiring error until proven otherwise. This requires the services of an experienced building biologist working in collaboration with an electrician to find and repair the wiring error, although we can help you and your electrician over the phone if you
don’t have a building biologist in your local area.

If you see an elevated magnetic field reading in the room that does not change substantially no matter where you move, and that elevated reading only changes slightly as you move from one end of the house to the other end, chances are your house is very close to an overhead (or
sometimes a buried) electric power line.

This is a serious situation in our experience, because you cannot shield against these magnetic fields and they are out of your control. In that case, if the levels are consistently high enough, higher than 2-3 milliGauss, we usually suggest you consider relocating in the near or long term, depending upon your existing health levels, whether you have young children, and other factors.

Finally, to fully detect and assess the presence of magnetic fields on grounding paths as well as from unbalanced loads between the hot and neutral conductors of a circuit, and to evaluate the effectiveness of your mitigation strategy, you will want to purchase a clamp meter, such as from
Fluke, to clamp around water pipes and also electric circuits, where accessible. Fluke makes a clamp meter accessory large enough to go around water pipes that plugs into your digital multimeter.

You can purchase a Fluke 80i 600 Amp Clamp-On AC Current Probe on Amazon for $75-100.

You can also purchase a smaller Triplett 9200A AC Mini Clamp-On Meter from Amazon for under $35 or from a local electronics store. This fits easily into breaker panels and around circuits when wall switches and outlets are opened.

=========
Why Use the Body Voltage Method?
=========

The simplest and most accurate way to test the ELF electric fields is to directly measure the AC voltage induced onto your skin. This method is called body voltage testing or skin voltage testing. This method works because the human body is electrically conductive.

Because our bodies are electrically conductive, they are always attracting and absorbing electromagnetic fields (EMFs), similar to any man-made antenna, like the one for your car radio which attracts radio frequency (RF) fields.

Because your skin is so conductive, the nearby electric fields can easily “collapse” or “couple” onto your skin, generating a measurable AC electrical voltage on the surface of your body. This is exactly what your new Body Voltage Meter is actually measuring – the electrical AC voltage that is induced onto your skin by the ELF electric fields around you.

=======
What You Can Do About the Electric Fields…
=======

Sometimes you can simply move a bed, couch or chair to a new location and reduce the exposure level. Often, you can unplug electrical power cords for lights and appliances, especially those near the beds. And at night, you can turn off the particular circuit breakers that are causing any high electric fields in the bedrooms.

Your existing unshielded wiring can be shielded with special shielding paints or other materials. Shielded cords can be installed onto lamps and appliances, especially those near beds. For new or remodel construction work, low-EMF “shielded wiring” can be installed using shielded wiring materials and special methods.

========
AC Electric Fields
========

Electric fields are mostly a problem at night when we sleep. I say to clients that electric fields wear you out, compared to magnetic fields, which wear you down. Electric fields cause an agitating influence at night when the body should be in a recuperative environment (all EMFs
should be avoided at night, but magnetic fields are least common in bedrooms at night). Most sleeping areas have elevated electric field levels, which come from voltage in plastic-jacketed (Romex) circuits in walls and plastic AC power cords that you plug in. Unplugging cords and
having plastic AC lamp cords replaced with MuCord shielded cord from LessEMF only helps when you have metal-clad wiring in your walls.

I measure electric fields most reliably using what we call the “Body Voltage” method. This involves the use of a Volt meter and wires that ground you and the meter to the earth. This measures electric fields in milliVolts (mV). The Tri-Field, Cornet ED88T and other hand heldmeters
also measure electric fields, but in Volts per meter, and I find this to not be as accurate or reliable as the body voltage method.

I have placed the older Tri-Field 100XE meter right over a lamp or extension cord and measured only a slight increase in electric field (roughly equal to 1 V/m, or the “1” position on the top scale of the Tri-Field 100XE meter), whereas that same cord would produce over 1,000 milliVolts using the body voltage method, considered by my profession to be an unsafe level for nighttime exposure when sleeping. For my purposes, it is not useful to use a hand-held electric field meter.

We consider levels below 100 milliVolts to be safe, and I have found that the average healthy person starts to notice that sleep is more disturbed and agitated starting at around 200-300 mV. The average bedroom, on the other hand, has 1,000 to 1,500 mV and up.

However, if you want to avoid the tangle of wires used in the body voltage method discussed above and have a handy, affordable combination meter you can fit in your purse or pocket, purchase the new digital Tri-Field Model TF-2, discussed in detail above. This has an electric field
setting that is quite sensitive, down to the 1.5 V/m level we consider safe in sleeping areas (when breakers are turned off).

You can also measure electric fields with another reliable hand-held meter. Gigahertz Solutions in Germany makes a combined Gaussmeter and electric field meter, available at Safe Living Technologies in Ontario, Canada (519-240-8735–please mention coupon code “CHHOM”). Model ME3030B retails for $122 USD. It measures both magnetic and electric fields in a single axis, so you will have to move it in various orientations to make sure you have not missed the field, but it is accurate and easy to use. This meter does measure easily down into the 1.5 V/m level and
below for electric fields. Thus 1.5 V/m is equivalent to 100 mV as measured by the body voltage meter. That is your target level, to be at or below 1.5 V/m in all orientations at all locations on the bed if you use the ME3030B or any other hand-held electric field meter.

To reduce electric fields at night, one option is to purchase a “plug-in switch” at any hardware store for about $5. These are two-pronged and can be plugged into an outlet near your bed. Then plug your lamp into the plug-in switch. Flip the plug-in switch so that the light comes on when
you turn it on at the lamp switch. Then, when you want to turn off the light at night, leave the lamp switch in the on position, and instead of shutting it off as you normally do, reach down and flip off the plug-in switch at the outlet. That way, the light goes off and the voltage in the plastic
cord goes dead, in which case the electric field level will be reduced and your sleep will be somewhat more deep. (You will also need to remove your electric clock radio and use a battery operated clock, and get rid of all other electric appliances within six to eight feet of your bed.)

Even if you use the plug-in switch, however, there will still be electric fields from the plasticjacketed Romex wiring in the walls (unless you are lucky enough to have metal-clad wiring in your house). Contact Oram about how to determine which type of wiring you have and how to
effectively reduce electric field levels if you have Romex wiring. Using plug-in switches will not be enough to produce the depth of sleep reported by many clients on the Comments from Clients page.

If you need a grounded, three-pronged shut-off switch, you can order the Belkin Conserve Power Switch for $6.99 from Amazon. You can also order it directly from Belkin. Belkin’s Conserve Power Switch is rated for 15 Amps, 1800 Watts. You can also order the GE 52149 Handy Switch Grounded White for $5.48 from Amazon. Belkin also makes a version of their Conserve Power Switch that has a timer on it (30 minutes, 3, or 6 hours) called the Belkin Conserve Socket F7C009q Energy-Saving Outlet for $9.99. It is available from Amazon. You can also purchase it directly from Belkin. It is also rated for 1800 Watts.

SOURCES (from the texts and that I recommend):

Site Creaty Healthy Homes:
https://drive.google.com/open?…..49jhG-Q82c

Site EMF Analysis:
https://drive.google.com/open?…..dL7o4lWVbu

Site EMFInfo dot org:
https://drive.google.com/open?…..dNDezY7G4B

Site The EI Wellspring:
https://drive.google.com/open?…..-91geS1MgG

November 8, 2018
1:32 am
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Eric.EST
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Good Question, I found on my cell phone RSS feed.

Can a meter not intended to measure dirty electricity be used to measure dirty electricity?

Lets just stand back and think inside the square,
First something like a tri-field meter has to be used at a distance from the energy source.
While a dirty electricity meter has to be connected to the power wiring, the dirty electricity meter I have gives two or more reading one of them is a average worked out over a few seconds after it is first turned on, while the other reading below it is constantly changing and also has a speaker included. I have already asked the supplier “to replace the numbers that is constantly changing, why dont they give a minimum & maximum amount then it is easier to see the best & worse limits.” but it seems it was designed by some other company.

For example if I switch off the dirty electricity filter and turn on the dirty meter I might get a reading like 389 mV the number below it is always changing plus & minus from 389 mV, then when I turn on the filter the improved reading drops to say 33 mV but still is constantly changing. And it might also display 99% reduction, “I think yeah right! Pull my other leg” it must use “Dirty math logic” to come up with those numbers”

If I was to design a Dirty Electricity meter I would start with a high pass filter that filters out the 50 or 60 Hertz mains and what you are left with is dirty electricity that was riding on the mains, then just wire that up to a milli-Volt meter.

So one might be left with the question “Can a meter that is not plugged into the mains, measure dirty electricity?” and the answer is mostly like be NO, unless the environment is inside a big Faraday cage, as the reading intended to measure the dirty electricity is also going to pick up extra local RF signals to inflate the reading and make the whole reading useless.

A much more cheaper method if you do not want to purchase a dirty electricity meter, would be to get a AM radio receiver and tune it so it is not on or near a radio station, unfortunately it does not measure the amount, but you could add a meter and measure the AC amount of audio going to the speaker. But then that reading would be pointless for high accuracy as the distance between the wiring & meter is a random measurement.

BY THE WAY [ gone from eric 1est edit] it was not worth saving

November 14, 2018
7:02 pm
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Derrils
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Hello. Can ED88T measuring the digital radio signal (DAB) frequency from 180 to 240 MHz? you know the sound of the beep on the meter from DAB toys radio?

November 15, 2018
6:38 pm
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Eric.EST
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Hello Derrils

To answer any question like that you just asked, you need to look at the “Frequency Range” of the instrument.

It turns out that the RF (Radio Frequency) frequency range of the ED88T is 100 MHz to 8000 MHz (8 GHz)

So the answer is YES.

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